Tag Archives: custom presentations

We’re Growing!

Presentation Designer Job Opportunity | SlideRabbitAfter a hugely successful 2013 and start to 2014, we’ve decided that the time has come to look for the right person to join our team! We’re excited to expand and continue to improve our speed and services for our present and future clients.

We’re looking for a talented designer with a keen eye for branding. This person should be excited about the challenges of pushing presentation software beyond the typical applications and creating high-quality pieces for a range of clientele.

Prefer to work in PJs? That’s A-OK for us as 95% of our work is done remotely. We’re especially interested in finding a new teammate near Boulder, CO or Chicago, IL but candidates from all over the U.S. are welcome to apply.

Since we’re growing, and not yet quite grown, this is a contract to hire position. Get in on the ground floor and grow with us!

Discover more about the new opportunity here!
And don’t forget to share with the talented designers in your life.

SlideRabbit Goes Clubbing!

Last week, we were thrilled to work on a deck celebrating the Communications and Public Affairs team of a large global PR firm. The event took place at The 40/40 Club, Jay-Z’s Manhattan lounge. Our slide deck played on 9-screen megascreens.

Heading up the design was our incredible Principal Creative, Tara Wilson-Valaitis. She truly is the Beyoncé of slides.

We are lucky enough to have our slides appear in courtrooms and boardrooms across the nation, but a nightclub is a first for us. Check out the pictures!

4040 Club | SlideRabbit Presentation Design
The blue images and base icon art included within this slide are from slides originally designed by the talented Magda Maslowska, of HauteSlides.

Contact us to get a super awesome presentation for your next meeting or corporate event!

Data Display: Which Format Fits Best?

In almost every slide deck, there’s at least one assertion requiring the back up of solid data. Presenters are faced with the challenge of how to display this data in a way that supports the conclusion offered in an easily understood way.

When choosing a format for data display, ask yourself the question, “What does this slide have to prove?” (Then, make that answer your title.) Explicitly identifying the main argument will help you evaluate whether your chart choice is doing its job. Let’s take a look at some common data display formats* and how and when they are best used:

Tables

Tables get a bad rap when it comes to informational design, but that’s only because they are often used when another format would have better represented the data. True, tables fail to make trends and patterns immediately obvious, but they still have value.

Custom Slide Design | Table Slide | Presentation ServicesTables are great at comparing detailed information about several related items at once. Take this table slide: The table delivers a lot of information about the importance of the various application capabilities across a range of application categories in a matrix format. This data does not need to convey a trend or pattern through numbers; it needs to show similarities across categories. This is when a table work best.

Line Graphs

Slide2Often line graphs are used to compare too many elements at once; the result is a cacophony of lines squirming all over the slide. A good rule of thumb for choosing a chart type is to select the chart type that will prove your argument most simply. Line graphs are best for showing simple trends over time. 

Bar Graphs

Slide3Bar graphs are a great choice when the information is a little more complex but needs to be easily compared over time or between groups. In this example, each bar represents overall stock value, and the stacked sections give more detail about where that value is coming from. Although it does represent change over time, using a line graph for this data would look chaotic.

Pie Charts

Pie charts take a lot of heat in the design community, but I firmly believe they have their place. They must be used carefully, as it is true that it is harder for the brain to judge the differences in area than differences in length. Pie charts should be avoided when the specific numbers represented are vital, when there are only small value differences among data points or when there are more then 5 or so data points.

Slide4However, pie charts excel at showing general percentages in the break down of a larger whole. This pie chart gives a quick and easy to understand overview of the make up of a company’s patent portfolio and uses color to speed understanding of finer points: the blues group the U.S. patents against the foreign patents, and the paler colors group the pending patents against those already granted.

Selecting the right format for your data is crucial to proving your point and persuading your audience. Special attention should be paid to whether the data is displayed powerfully. Does it address the assertion in your title? Is it easy to understand quickly? Are your annotations and labels meaningful or extraneous? Good graph design is like any other good design. Everything that appears on the slide must have a reason for being there and it all must work together to create meaning.

Visit our portfolio for more slide design examples!

 *All slides in this post are taken from the body of work for one particular client. Sensitive information, including company identity, has been withheld.